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© 2018 Jacob A. Courser

Floating Over Plainville

Hot air balloons remind us that that life is both fun and beautiful -- that there doesn't need to be a reason to travel. It's the philosophy of "let's see where the wind takes us!"

 

How I got this shot is pure luck! I had been volunteering as a ground crew member for a hot air balloon for some time but this was the first time I had met this pilot. To my surprise, he asked me to climb into the basket just before he lifted off!

Lancaster County

I took this photo while I was down in the Philadelphia region for business during the summer of 2016. I was driving by Lancaster County and I stumbled upon this scene from my car. I was so amazed that I had to turn around and explore this road.

 

The secret to this shot was an opportune moment at an opportune time. It just so happened to be my favorite time of day: late afternoon or "The Golden Hour." The sun is what makes this photo so great. 

Nowhere, MA

I came across this scene while driving through rural Massachusetts with a friend. The structure was haunting; its abandonedness boldly exclaiming itself, standing quietly yet loudly in a field of cut corn and bitter winter winds.

 

It makes me wonder about the things that pull us in during this lifetime. Could an open field signify a blank canvas to our hearts, and could a lone standing structure be the focus or mission of our minds? For surely nature mirrors the human condition.

 
 

Roads

This photo was taken while I was walking around the town I lived in at the time, Bourne, MA, which is part of Massachusetts and Cape Cod. They have an old railway that is largely decommissioned except the track now runs a dinner train. I have no idea who the man is in the photo. I just took the shot.

 

This photo almost never made it here because the day was overcast and my camera was far under par. I was just about to trash it when I came up with an idea: If I could not make the photo better, why not make it worse? I got to work applying digital film grain and processing that was sure to lower the fidelity. What came forth was this delightful piece.

 

This photograph was featured in the Aerie Journal, 2015.

Reconditioning

I am quite fond of how this photo turned out. I was leading a photo shoot with a friend, and following the philosophy that I described in Roads, I kept in mind my digital alterations. Many photos came of that day, but I picked this one because my model appears both fragile and fierce. There is a human being hiding behind the mask, and as trite as that may seem, I find it beautiful.

The process here is called Glitch Art, where one distorts an image by exploiting a glitch in the way non-image programs handle image codecs.